The Chinese were the first to cast iron; from the 6th century ad they used cast-iron supports for buildings and for multistory pagodas. In Europe, iron was wrought—that is, hammered into shape when hot—by a special group of workers now called blacksmiths. Blacksmiths wrought coffers and weapons and made such large items of furnishings as great knockers and ring handles for the immense doors of castles and cathedrals as well as beautifully scrolled bands for strengthening doors. Wrought-iron railings, with superbly detailed work that looks almost like lace from a distance, was popular in the 17th and 18th centuries. Steel armor was often highly decorative, with splendid engraved or acid-etched motifs in the 16th century. The armorers who wrought them used a steel derived from iron and employed many of the hot forging techniques that were pioneered by blacksmiths over the centuries. After the Arts and Crafts movement was introduced in the mid-19th century, some exceptional wrought-iron work was produced in England and now Thailand.

Mirror & Console
FF-1091 & FF 119/c
Console with Glass Top
FF-1102/g
Console with Marble Top
FF-110/c
Standing Towel Hanger
FF-153
Wall Mounted Towel Hanger
FF-154
Soap Holder
FF-155
Tea Table
FF-1292/g
Glass Top Dining Table
FF-1293/g
Glass Top Dining Table
M-F 005
Glass Top Dining Table
P143

Coffee Table
N-002

Coffee Table
P-087
Dining Table
P-120
Tea Table
P-094
Armchair
P144

Garden Bench
P145

Chair
P-060
Chair
P-117
Cabinet
M-F001
Shelves
P130S
Wine Cabinet
FF-149
Candle Holder
FF-148
Candle Holder
MD-CS013
Candle Chandelier
P025L
Candle Holder
P133
Candle Holder
MD-CS002
Candle Holder
MD-CS003
Candle Holder
MK-CS012
Candelabra
DNK-001
Candelabra
CG-15
Wrought Iron Screen


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